Gutisko Razda, the language spoken by the Visigoths

Visigoths were a branch of the Goths, who in turn belonged to the East Germanic tribes that between 600 and 300 BC migrated from Scandinavia to the region between the Oder and Vistula rivers. Some researchers believe that the Visigoths are the same people as the Thervingi, as the sixth century AD historian Jordanes says…Continue readingGutisko Razda, the language spoken by the Visigoths

Lapis Niger, the shrine where the first known Latin inscription was found, was already a mystery to the Romans themselves

In 1898 the Venetian archaeologist Giacomo Boni was appointed director of the excavations of the Roman Forum at the Italian capital, a position he held until his death in 1925. Among the discoveries he made during that period are an Iron Age necropolis, the Regia (first a barracks and then the seat of Rome’s highest…Continue readingLapis Niger, the shrine where the first known Latin inscription was found, was already a mystery to the Romans themselves

A 4,500-year-old Mesopotamian pillar contains the first deciphered inscription about border disputes

A marble pillar or stele that has been preserved in the British Museum for 150 years bears a cuneiform inscription, deciphered in late 2018, and which has turned out to be the first known record of a border dispute. It also mentions, for the first time, the term no-man’s-land. The pillar is Mesopotamian and about…Continue readingA 4,500-year-old Mesopotamian pillar contains the first deciphered inscription about border disputes

The Dur-Kurigalzu ziggurat that medieval travelers mistook for the Tower of Babel

In the Iraqi desert, some 30 kilometres west of Baghdad, stands an impressive mound that, at first sight, looks like a simple rock eroded by the wind over the centuries. But nothing could be further from truth, for it is made of bricks and what is left of it was once the core of a…Continue readingThe Dur-Kurigalzu ziggurat that medieval travelers mistook for the Tower of Babel

More than 200 people live in Edinburgh of the Seven Seas, the remotest town in the world, where outsiders are forbidden to settle

If you have ever wondered what it would be like to live in a place so isolated that there is no other inhabited place within 1350 miles, the answer can easily be obtained. Just travel to the town of Edinburgh of the Seven Seas and ask one of its 246 neighbors (population on April 4,…Continue readingMore than 200 people live in Edinburgh of the Seven Seas, the remotest town in the world, where outsiders are forbidden to settle

The ancient sculptors of the stone heads and potbellies of Monte Alto, Guatemala, knew the magnetic properties of the rocks

On February 1976 archaeologists found a sculpted turtle head with magnetic properties in the ceremonial center of Izapa in the coastal plain of the State of Chiapas in Mexico. Radiocarbon dating gave that sculpture the date of 1500 BC. About 150 km to the southeast, in the ancient ceremonial center of Monte Alto in Guatemala,…Continue readingThe ancient sculptors of the stone heads and potbellies of Monte Alto, Guatemala, knew the magnetic properties of the rocks

The Missal of Silos, the oldest European book made of paper

Egyptians wrote on papyrus, a material made from the plant of the same name (Cyperus papyrus) that grows on the banks of the Nile, before the 30th century BC. Later, during the Greco-Roman antiquity, the use of parchment became popular, made from sheep or goat skins tanned and polished to allow the fixing of the…Continue readingThe Missal of Silos, the oldest European book made of paper

The Assyrians, the people who built an empire in Mesopotamia 4,000 years ago, still exist

Assyria is the ancient region of northern Mesopotamia around the city of Assur, founded around 2600 BC on the banks of the Tigris (today its ruins are in northern Iraq). It was part of the Akkadian Empire of Sargon of Akkad until 2154 BC, which united all the Mesopotamian cities. And from the second millennium…Continue readingThe Assyrians, the people who built an empire in Mesopotamia 4,000 years ago, still exist

Welcome Stranger, the largest gold nugget ever found

Mainly thanks to the cinema we identify the Gold Rush with the one that broke out in 1848 in California and that would last almost a century, bringing together thousands of miners and fortune seekers in a migratory and colonizing phenomenon that, however, was not unique. Around the same time, other countries such as Australia,…Continue readingWelcome Stranger, the largest gold nugget ever found

Valknut, the Nordic symbol whose original meaning and name are unknown

Although today it is sadly famous for its appropriation and use by some supremacist groups, the truth is that Nordic Valknut seems to be more related to religion and funeral rites than to politics or other types of issues. It is a symbol that appears on inscriptions and rune stones, rings, furniture, ships and other…Continue readingValknut, the Nordic symbol whose original meaning and name are unknown