The French resistance in Lille that saved time for the British to be evacuated in Dunkirk

If we talk about battles of the Second World War, the names of some that are already inevitable references will come to mind, from Stalingrad to Berlin to El Alamein, Pearl Harbor, Guadalcanal, the Bulge and several more very famous ones. But there were others that are not so well known, even if some of…Continue readingThe French resistance in Lille that saved time for the British to be evacuated in Dunkirk

Corupedium, the battle that ended the long war between Alexander’s successors

It is curious that one of the most extensive empires of antiquity had such a weak foundation that, in reality, it was only based on the charisma of its builder. We’re talking about Alexander the Great. That giant with feet of clay that he formed with his military genius fell apart as soon as his…Continue readingCorupedium, the battle that ended the long war between Alexander’s successors

Corsican Republic, the small and ephemeral independent state that held the first modern constitution

In 1775, on the occasion of the outbreak of the American War of Independence, a group of students from King’s College (now Columbia University), among whom was Alexander Hamilton, George Washington’s future right-hand man, founded a militia which, under the motto God and our right (the same as the British crown Dieu et mon droit…Continue readingCorsican Republic, the small and ephemeral independent state that held the first modern constitution

Carsten Niebuhr, the scientist who crossed the Middle East disguised as an Arab as the only survivor of the Royal Danish Expedition

Scientific travel became widespread among European countries from the mid-18th century following the establishment of the Enlightenment. And although the most famous were led by the great powers of the time (United Kingdom, France, Spain …), there were other nations that joined the trend. One of them was Denmark, which in 1761 organized an expedition…Continue readingCarsten Niebuhr, the scientist who crossed the Middle East disguised as an Arab as the only survivor of the Royal Danish Expedition

China’s colossal Grand Canal, which reached 1,120 miles in length

If we talk about the Grand Canal, inevitably our mind takes us to Venice, to that great arm of water four kilometers long that vertebrates the city dividing it in two halves and whose waters furrow dozens of gondolas and vaporettos. However, not only is it not the only one in the world, but there…Continue readingChina’s colossal Grand Canal, which reached 1,120 miles in length

Bartolomeu Português, the lusitanian buccaneer who created the code of piracy

In its different variants, a black flag with a skull and crossbones is today synonymous with adventure, almost always linked to literature or cinema. In reality, this is only the romantic image that was given of piracy in the 19th century to exalt the free spirit of those who were not willing to submit to…Continue readingBartolomeu Português, the lusitanian buccaneer who created the code of piracy

Miami, the city founded in 1896 on the land of a sole person

On September 14th, 1898, a few weeks after the US and Spain signed an armistice in the Spanish-American War and the Spanish army capitulated to the US in Manila, meningitis killed a middle-aged woman who left a series of debts but was buried in a preferential place at the Miami cemetery. It was only fair,…Continue readingMiami, the city founded in 1896 on the land of a sole person

Battle on the Ice, the medieval battle fought on a frozen lake

If you haven’t already watched Sergei Eisenstein’s movie, Alexander Nevsky, I recommend that you look for it and watch it, regardless of whether it’s a 1938 black and white film or not. Not only because this director’s titles are still visually fascinating three quarters of a century later, but also because, after reading this article,…Continue readingBattle on the Ice, the medieval battle fought on a frozen lake

How a lawyer bought Stonehenge in 1915

Stonehenge is England’s most important prehistoric monument and undoubtedly the world’s most famous chromlech. UNESCO added it to its World Heritage list in 1986, increasing the level of protection it had from a century earlier, when it was declared a Scheduled Monument, a classification used in the United Kingdom for outstanding archaeological or historical sites.…Continue readingHow a lawyer bought Stonehenge in 1915

The Chinese woman who became queen of piracy with a fleet of hundreds of ships

The classic image we have of piracy is that of a masculine and Caribbean world, something that would have to be quite nuanced. Firstly, because although it is true that buccaneers and filibusters operated basically in the Caribbean and its surroundings, it is also true that piracy is probably one of the oldest occupations in…Continue readingThe Chinese woman who became queen of piracy with a fleet of hundreds of ships