The enigmatic 512 Manuscript describing an ancient Mediterranean civilization in pre-Hispanic Brazil

Like a Lovecraft tale, the Rare Works section of the National Library of Brazil jealously guards a strange ten-page document baptized with the suggestive name of Manuscript 512. It narrates an eighteenth-century expedition during which the ruins of an ancient city were discovered that seemed to have developed a classical civilization in the Mediterranean style.…Continue readingThe enigmatic 512 Manuscript describing an ancient Mediterranean civilization in pre-Hispanic Brazil

The sword embedded in the rock of the precipice of Rocamadour for 9 centuries

Durandal (or Durandarte) was the famous sword of Roland, the Frankish knight who died at the Battle of Roncevaux Pass on 15 August 788 by attack of the Basques. The accounts of that battle and the subsequent fate of the sword are plagued with mythical stories with little or no historical or archaeological basis. For…Continue readingThe sword embedded in the rock of the precipice of Rocamadour for 9 centuries

How archaeologists found the origin of the legend of King Midas, who turned everything he touched into gold

One of the best-known legends of antiquity is that of the Phrygian king Midas, who turned everything he touched into gold. According to Aristotle, he died of starvation when it was impossible to touch any food without transforming it into the precious metal. The problem is that there are at least three kings with that…Continue readingHow archaeologists found the origin of the legend of King Midas, who turned everything he touched into gold